Durst & Rumsfeld & Morris: No One Tells the Whole Truth

If you're not watching HBO's documentary on Robert Durst, The Jinx, you should. If you do, you probably had to manually close your jaw after Andrew Jarecki (the director) interviewed him present day and Durst was caught with a hot mic during a break, repeating to himself (on the subject of his murder trial in Texas), "I did not knowingly, purposefully, intentionally lie. I did make mistakes." He seems to be rehearsing for how the conversation will pick up after a break. His lawyer advises him that the mic is on and that the cameras are getting all of his self-talk. Durst's lawyers then came over to tell him that his mic was still on and that they were able to hear everything, but he did not seem to care at all. He doubles down and confirms he meant what he said: "I did not tell the whole truth. Nobody tells the whole truth." "I did not tell the whole truth," Durst told one of his lawyers. "Nobody tells the whole truth." The moment is shocking, and many viewers undoubtedly heard that as, "Of course I lied on the stand" or maybe even "I probably killed this guy, and others, because clearly you see I have no problem lying." But I do think the point Durst is making -- albeit inelegantly -- is that human brains just don't tell the whole truth. The premise that we can is false. Coming from Durst (partnered with his famous twitching and squirming) this fact...

Ghostbusters & the Environmental Regulation Debate, 1997

Thanks to Futility Closet for pointing me to this wonderful piece about Ghostbusters' substance as “a thoughtful introduction to environmental law and policy, suitable for discussion in a law school class.” Christine Alice Corcos' "Who Ya Gonna C(S)ite": Ghostbusters and the Environmental Regulation Debate (Copyright © 1997 Florida State University Journal of Land Use & Environmental Law) examines this and more. The Ghostbuster facility is housed in a former fire station, in which the Ghostbusters also reside.[35] The surrounding area seems to have a mixture of small businesses and warehouses.[36] One may well ask whether the area is zoned for uses that include waste storage facilities. If not, the city might object that the facility is a public nuisance. The neighbors may argue that the Ghostbusters' facility is a private nuisance[37] due to their strange activities including the comings and goings of various employees and visitors, the sirens on the Ghostbusters vehicle,[38] and the oddity of some of their clientele.[39] Just go read it. ...

Paying for Commitment

"Instead of defining hours per week in contracts with employees, freelancers or virtual workers, you define a commitment level. You don't care how many hours they work, when and where, or how they mix their private and professional lives. The only thing you care about is how much you can count on the contributions, effort and collaboration of your workers, in the projects to which they have been assigned." --Pay People for Commitment, Not for Time or Results ...