IBM’s Annual Report

Having worked client-side in a corporate responsibility and sustainability marketing group tasked with researching, creating and marketing an annual report, I can attest to how big a challenge it is. Particularly at a company as big as IBM. It's a monumental effort that requires so much buy-in across the globe, and getting to a place where you're actually innovating how people (not just stakeholders) get the information can be the biggest hurdle. IBM's 2014 annual report is intuitive, well-organized and engaging, offering a true experience across all the sections of the report as well as the legal and mandatory elements that can sometimes slow down creativity (PDF downloads, accessibility, financials). Not to mention it's fun to read more about their efforts! ...

Let’s Hang at SXSW Saturday: UX & Content Meetup

I'm hosting an informal meet-up on Saturday, March 14 to discuss all things content and UX. More than anything, I'm hoping to get people from across both disciplines to come together and talk about processes and innovations they're using (or fighting for) in their organizations that help bring UX to the table in meaningful ways for clients. Whether you're client-side, agency or freelance, I want to hear your voice and opinions (the stronger the better! just be nice!) this weekend at SXSW Interactive. The meet-up is from 3:30-4:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 14 in Room 502-503 at the JW Marriott. Add it to your schedule and share with your friends by visiting the official listing here. Any questions? Feel free to reach out via LinkedIn or email: paige.maguire@razorfish.com....

Denis Boudreau Joins Simply Accessible

Great news! “The founding principles of web accessibility instantly made sense to me. For a couple of years, it was just about building an efficient process. It’s only later that I started to really look at accessibility and its benefits from a human perspective.” —Denis Boudreau ...

Paul Ford on HTML5 and the Group That Runs the Web

Paul Ford, for The New Yorker: You might have read that, on October 28th, W3C officially recommended HTML5. And you might know that this has something to do with apps and the Web. The question is: Does this concern you? The answer, at least for citizens of the Internet, is yes: it is worth understanding both what HTML5 is and who controls the W3C. And it is worth knowing a little bit about the mysterious, conflict-driven cultural process whereby HTML5 became a “recommendation.” Billions of humans will use the Web over the next decade, yet not many of those people are in a position to define what is “the Web” and what isn’t. The W3C is in that position. So who is in this cabal? What is it up to? Who writes the checks? Read it all at The New Yorker ...

Jonathan Stark “Mobile Last”

"After all, HTML is responsive by default. If you approach the design by starting small and working your way up with both responsive web design and progressive enhancement, you get mobile for free." --Mobile Last ...